Target Hits Bulls Eye: Sensory Friendly Clothing For Children

Photo Credit: Target.com

Photo Credit: Target.com

According to Disability Scoop, "Both sensory-friendly and adaptive styles will become a regular part of Target’s clothing options for children". How did this happen? Well, Stacey Monsen is a designer at Target, and her daughter lives with autism. She identified challenges associated with dressing with autism while dressing her daughter. So she gathered a group of colleagues who volunteered to research this topic. They were dedicated and thorough, even taking time to interview Target guests within the disability community. This research proved to be valuable, and helped Stacey and her team write a strong proposal to present to Julie Guggemos, senior vice president, Product Design & Development.

Personally this is a bit of a jaw dropping moment. A decade ago while working in radio as a morning drive deejay. I decided I wanted to draw attention to the lack of clothing options many people with disabilities. So, I packed away all of my clothing and only wore Target pajamas for a year as the PJ Deejay. So to learn that Target.com now sells Cat & Jack sensory-friendly and adaptive clothing for children. I was gleefully blown away.

Today, people with disabilities are in the media more than any other time in history. Especially Target, I always see children with disabilities in Target television, new media, and print ads. Which is why I have to shout-out media inclusion powerhouses like Katie Driscoll, founder of Changing the Face of Beauty, for her tireless commitment to championing the inclusion of children with disabilities in media. Good House Keeping magazine also recognized her work by naming her one of the 2017 Awesome Women Honorees.

Here are my takeaways from the article:

  1. Know your numbers when discussing the need for more clothing options for people with disabilities
  2. Conduct quantitative and qualitative research when developing a proposal for a brands consideration
  3. Consult people with disabilities within the brands customer base (you would be surprise how often this is overlooked)
  4. . Don't complain about the problem, be about the solution
  5. If you're a person with a disability or a care giver speak up and ask for what you need and want.

 

Target.com

Target.com